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Within every skull sits a "three pound enigma" that has more storage capacity, processing power and connections than all the computers on the planet put together.

Oxford takes on the grand research challenge of the 21st century

Understanding how this densely interwoven three pound mass functions, let alone how it generates thought and consciousness, is truly a monumental task. Many people have called the race to understand the human brain the Grand Research Challenge of the 21st Century.

Researchers are working day and night to scan, model and understand the human brain. A truly global effort is now underway and countless benefits for computing, society and healthcare await on the other side of it.

The Computational Neurology Lab (CNL) at the University of Oxford is taking on this Grand Research Challenge of the 21st Century and has partnered up with hospitals, clinicians, psychiatrists, surgeons and several large data providers to build and test a wearable device that both captures and interprets multi-modal data. The team is actively using Dr Newton Howard’s Fundamental Code Unit (FCU) and Brain Code (BC) theories to map these different sources into a shared coordinate system, where they may be effectively analysed for new patterns. Further clinical trials of the device are expected to be performed throughout the autumn.

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