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'The 100,000 Genomes Project'

The 100,000 Genomes Project was launched in 2012 by David Cameron as part of the Olympic legacy, and aims to establish a new genomic medicine service through the NHS by sequencing the entire genomes of around 70,000 people with rare inherited diseases or cancer.   This is an NHS transformational programme, working with hospital Trusts through each of 13 Genomic Medicine Centres around the country (of which Oxford is one) to deliver the project at a local level. This includes developing pathways for identifying and recruiting patients, engaging and training clinical staff and setting up the necessary infrastructure, processes and systems, both clinical and diagnostic, to be able to continue the service once the project is over.

Further information about the project at national level can be found here: http://www.genomicsengland.co.uk/

Biography

Jennifer WhitfieldJennifer Whitfield is a clinical scientist in genetics, based at the Oxford Regional Genetics Laboratory. She trained in Bristol as a cytogeneticist and after completing her FRCPath Part 1 examination, she focussed her career on molecular genetics. Her role in training scientists within the profession increased when she moved to Oxford in June 2014. In March 2016, she became the training and education lead for the Oxford NHS Genomic Medicine to support the 100,000 Genomes Project. She continues to support service work within the Regional Genetics Laboratory where she is based and will return full time to this once her training contract has ended in March 2018.

 

All members of the University and NHS clinical staff are welcome.

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