Skip to main content

The overall goal of our research is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the causes of bone cancer.

Tibia from control (left) and myeloma-bearing (right) mice, with osteoclast activity stained red. © Copyright: Edwards Group 2013
Tibia from control (left) and myeloma-bearing (right) mice, with osteoclast activity stained red.

Cancer-induced bone disease is a characteristic feature of several types of cancer, including the hematological malignancy multiple myeloma, and other tumors that metastasise to bone such as breast, prostate and lung. In addition to the development of debilitating skeletal complications, the bone marrow provides a unique hospitable microenvironment, and once tumors become established in bone, they are largely unresponsive to treatment.

The overall goal of our research is to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathogenesis, and so identify and validate novel therapeutic approaches. Our focus is on the role of the tumor microenvironment and tumor-host interactions.

Our team

Selected publications

Research Projects

News

Pioneering research aims to end misery of cancer-induced bone pain

Researchers at Oxford University have launched a pioneering project to tackle crippling bone pain suffered by thousands of cancer patients.

NDS researcher is first recipient of public engagement award

Dr Emma Morris has been named as the first ever recipient of the annual Neil Mackenzie Public Engagement Award by the Bone Research Society (BRS).

Oxford scientists present skeleton session at Hay Festival 2017

Last week, Drs Emma Morris and James Edwards were invited to take part in the popular Hay Festival in Hay-on-Wye.

Related research themes