Cookies on this website

We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Accept all cookies' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. If you click 'Reject all non-essential cookies' only necessary cookies providing core functionality such as security, network management, and accessibility will be enabled. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

With funding from Kidney Research UK, a team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Nottingham and University College London will develop ways to assess donor kidneys and predict how well they will work after transplant.

Female researcher in lab with microscope in foreground © Medical Sciences Division and John Cairns

Having a kidney transplant is the best treatment for kidney failure, but the demand for donated kidneys is high.

To save more lives, doctors are accepting kidneys from older or higher risk donors. These kidneys may work less well after transplantation. But this can be devastating as people receiving them may need to rgo back on dialysis, and wait for another transplant.

Right now, doctors cannot accurately assess donor kidneys and predict how well a transplant will work or how long a kidney will last after it is transplanted.

Thanks to the Kidney Research UK grant award of £237,626, in partnership with the Stoneygate Trust, the ADMIRE study ‘Assessing Donor kidneys and Monitoring Transplant REcipients’ aims to address this clinical challenge. 

Dr Maria Kaisar from Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) is the Principal Investigator on the study and leads a team of co-Investigators from NDS (Professor Rutger Ploeg, Dr Edward Sharples, Mr Simon Knight, Mr James Hunter and Dr Sadr Shaheed), the Oxford Big Data Institute (Dr Alberto Sandos and Dr Philip Charles) and the Radcliffe Department of Medicine (Dr Elizabeth Tunnicliffe)

Predicting the best kidneys for transplant

Dr Kaisar and her team at NDS will utilise the Oxford Transplant Biobank (OTB) and the Quality in Organ Donation (QUOD) biobank to look for marker proteins in blood samples from donors and use them to develop a mathematical model to predict how well donor kidneys will work after transplantation.

This funding will enable us to bring scientific and clinical expertise together and in collaboration develop novel non-invasive methods to better assess donor kidneys and predict how well a transplant will work in the recipient - Dr Maria Kaisar

The model would mean doctors could accurately assess kidneys and only transplant those that will function well. It could identify suitable kidneys previously deemed too high risk to transplant.

With Professors Sue Francis and David Long from the University of Nottingham and University College London, the NDS team will use the QUOD X platform to also develop MRI scanning methods to perform both on the donor organ before it is transplanted and later on the recipient to monitor how well the transplanted organ is functioning.

“I am absolutely delighted that our study received this funding award by Kidney Research UK in partnership with The Stoneygate Trust,” said Dr Kaisar. “This funding will enable us to bring scientific and clinical expertise together and in collaboration develop novel non-invasive methods to better assess donor kidneys and predict how well a transplant will work in the recipient. We also envisage that our planned scientific work will offer many opportunities to our early career scientists to further develop their skills and research expertise in studying kidney disease."

Similar stories

Genetic mapping of tumours reveals how cancers grow

Researchers from the University of Oxford, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Science for Life Laboratory, and the Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden, have found that individual prostate tumours contain a previously unknown range of genetic variation.

Two NDS researchers receive prestigious MRC Clinical Research Training Fellowships

Miss Catherine Lovegrove and Dr Alexander Sagar from the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) have been awarded highly competitive Clinical Research Training Fellowships by the Medical Research Council (MRC).

New Associate Professor announced

We are delighted to announce that Tom Cosker has been awarded the title of Associate Professor in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS).

Blog posts

Oxford MedSci goes silver: 10 Years of Athena SWAN

The Medical Sciences Division is celebrating 10 years since its first Athena Swan bronze application, and the first year in which all 16 of its departments have achieved a silver award. The silver award recognises commitment to gender equality, understanding culture and context, and more. Read about our department’s hard work and innovation.

Lights, camera, action! My journey into video production

Dr Hannah McGivern provides a 'behind-the-scenes' account of her experience producing the video 'Journey of a QUOD Sample: Donating to Transplant Research', supported by the funds from the University of Oxford Public Engagement with Research (PER) Seed Fund.

Mentoring in practice

NDS has launched a new, interdepartmental mentoring scheme called RECOGNISE. In this podcast, Gemma Horbatowski (HR Advisor) interviews Monica Dolton (Programme Manager and Research Project Manager) about her experiences of mentor-mentee relationships.