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In collaboration with the Oxford University Global Surgery Group, a research workshop was recently held at Chittagong Medical College (CMC) in Bangladesh to promote a research culture amongst young medical professionals.

Professor Tahmina Banu, Director, CRICS (4th from left, sitting); Professor Selim Jahangir, Principal, Chittagong Medical College (3rd from right, sitting); Dr. Hossain Zillur Rahman, Chairman PPRC and Convener, Healthy Bangladesh (4th from right, sitting); Professors of various departments of CMC in front row, top-scoring research teams in back row

The 'Social Determinants of Health' research workshop was organised by the Chittagong Research Institute for Children Surgery (CRICS), the Power and Participation Research Centre (PPRC) and Health Bangladesh, and was supported by the Chittagong Medical College Student Union (CMCSU).

During a simple ceremony in the new auditorium, the importance of research-oriented medical education was underscored by the speakers and at the announcement of the results and distribution of prizes.

Fifty CMC students and interns, formed into 10 research teams, took part in the workshop and research. A four-member jury board comprising of CRICS Director Professor Dr. Tahmina Banu, Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics Deputy Director Dr. Alamgir Hossen, National Public Health Advisor to Health Ministry of India, Professor Nabhojit Roy and Pediatric Surgeon Professor Kokila Lakhoo of the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences at Oxford University, evaluated the research papers.

The top-scoring team topic was ‘A Review of Doctor-Patient Relationship: A study on Chronically Ill Patients from the point of view of Counselling’. The 1st and 2nd runners-up team topics respectively were: “Psychosocial Determinants Regarding Use and Continuation of Oral Contraceptive Pills among Women of Chattogram District” and “Out-of-Pocket Expense Scenario of Patients in Medicine and Surgery Wards of CMCH”. CRICS and PPRC jointly provided monetary prizes of Taka 25,000, 10,000 and 5,000 to the three top-scoring teams. The prizes were handed over to the teams by CMC Principal Professor Dr. Selim Jahangir.

In her speech, CRICS Director and former Professor of Pediatric Surgery of CMCH Professor Dr. Tahmina Banu stressed that the workshop was on a limited scale, all efforts were made to ensure quality at all stages of the process including international jurors. She exhorted young doctors to seize the opportunities for improving their skills so as to keep pace with a fast changing world.

In his speech, CMC Principal Professor Dr. Selim Jahangir lauded the CRICS-PPRC-Healthy Bangladesh initiative and assured of continued support to such innovative skills enhancement programmes. He informed that CMC has prioritized quality in its education programmes which was attracting large number of students even from Sri Lanka.

In his closing speech, PPRC Chairman and Healthy Bangladesh Convener Dr. Hossain Zillur Rahman vowed to build on the introductory experience of the research skills workshop at CMC both through further programmess at CMC and at newer institutions including Ibrahim Medical College in Dhaka. Dr. Rahman stressed that in the SDG era, quality is paramount and to ensure quality medical education is a national priority in which partnerships such as that between CMC and CRICS-PPRC will be critical to supplement government efforts.

Pictured below: the top scoring team receiving a cheque for Taka 25,000, the fund provided by CRICS

Top scoring team at the research workshop at Chittagong Medical College in Bangladesh

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