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OBJECTIVES: Good interprofessional communication is fundamental to effective teamworking in medicine. Finalmed is a private course that teaches the principles and methods of clinical presenting as an iterative technique of reasoning though clinical data. We have tested the efficacy of this technique using a questionnaire-based study. DESIGN: An anonymized 10-point Likert scale questionnaire was designed. SETTING: Questionnaires were distributed at five UK courses and two UAE courses. PARTICIPANTS: Questionnaires were given to all students attending these courses. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The questionnaire included pre- and post-course questions addressing self-reported confidence in clinical presenting (CCP) and effectiveness in clinical presenting (ECP). We also asked whether attendees felt that clinical presenting should be integrated formally into medical school curricula. RESULTS: A total of 331/395 questionnaires were returned. Median improvement in CCP was 50% (P < 0.0001) and in ECP was 40% (P < 0.0001), irrespective of country of study, graduate entry status and whether the student felt that they had been exposed to these techniques previously. Students recorded a strong opinion in favour of integrating the content and style of the Finalmed course into their medical school curriculum, with 286 students (86%) recording a score of ≥8. CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that after a two- or three-day dedicated course, both self-reported confidence and effectiveness in clinical presenting significantly improve. Furthermore, students in the UK and the UAE returned a desire for integration into medical school curricula of IPC through the teaching of clinical presenting.

Original publication

DOI

10.1258/shorts.2011.011065

Type

Journal article

Journal

JRSM Short Rep

Publication Date

08/2011

Volume

2