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This paper reviews the available data on the prevalence of thrombophilia defects in patients with peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and attempts to delineate the risk of failure of vascular intervention in these patients. The prevalence of thrombophilia in stable claudicants is 25% and increases to 40% in those requiring revascularisation, compared to only 11% in the control group. The overall prevalence of thrombophilia defects in patients with premature atherosclerosis appears to be between 15 and 30%. The prevalence in the typical cohort of patients with PVD appears to be similar. All these studies have recruited patients with symptoms significant enough to warrant intervention. The overall prevalence of thrombophilia calculated from these trials, therefore, may not be truly indicative of the general vascular population who may not even present primary or secondary healthcare. The risk of thrombotic occlusion following arterial revascularisation in patients with an identified thrombophilia defect appears to be almost three times that of patients with no evidence of a thrombophilia defect. The best management of these patients has not been determined and needs to be evaluated by prospective randomized trials.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.ejvs.2004.03.027

Type

Journal article

Journal

Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg

Publication Date

08/2004

Volume

28

Pages

124 - 131

Keywords

Adult, Aneurysm, Antiphospholipid Syndrome, Arterial Occlusive Diseases, Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation, Carotid Artery Diseases, Humans, Peripheral Vascular Diseases, Prevalence, Protein C Deficiency, Prothrombin, Thrombophilia