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Together with carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) form a group of physiologically important gaseous transmitters, sometimes referred to as the "gaseous triumvirate". The three molecules share a wide range of physical and physiological properties: they are small gaseous molecules, able to freely penetrate cellular membranes; they are all produced endogenously in the body and they seem to exert similar biological functions. In the cardiovascular system, for example, they are all vasodilators, promote angiogenesis and protect tissues against damage (e.g. ischemia-reperfusion injury). In addition, they have complex roles in inflammation, with both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects reported. Researchers have focused their efforts in understanding and describing the roles of each of these molecules in different physiological systems, and in the past years attention has also been given to the gases interaction or "cross-talk". This review will focus on the role of NO and H2S in inflammation and will give an overview of the evidence collected so far suggesting the importance of their cross-talk in inflammatory processes.

Original publication

DOI

10.1016/j.niox.2014.05.014

Type

Journal article

Journal

Nitric Oxide

Publication Date

15/09/2014

Volume

41

Pages

38 - 47

Keywords

Cross-talk, Hydrogen sulfide, Inflammation, Nitric oxide, Animals, Humans, Hydrogen Sulfide, Inflammation, Mice, Nitric Oxide, Rats