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Between 2010 and 2013, we recorded 66 cases of failed organ donation after brain death (DBD) due to the excessive use of the vasoactive drugs resulting in impaired hepatic and/or renal function. To investigate the effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in donor management, ECMO was used to provide support for DBD donors with circulatory and/or respiratory failure from 2013 to 2015. A retrospective cohort study between circulatory non-stable DBD with vasoactive drugs (DBD-drug) and circulatory non-stable DBD with ECMO (DBD-ECMO) was designed to compare the transplant outcomes. A total of 19 brain death donors were supported by ECMO. The incidence rate of post-transplant liver primary non-function (PNF) was 10% (two of 20) in DBD-drug group and zero in DBD-ECMO group. Kidney function indicators, including creatinine clearance and urine production, were significantly better in DBD-ECMO group, as well as the kidney delayed graft function (DGF) rate was found to be decreased by the use of ECMO in our study. Donation success rate increased steadily from 47.8% in 2011 to 84.6% in 2014 after the ECMO intervention. The use of ECMO in assisting circulatory and respiratory function of DBD can reduce liver and kidney injury from vasoactive drugs, thereby improving organ quality and reducing the organ discard rates.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/ctr.12823

Type

Journal article

Journal

Clin transplant

Publication Date

10/2016

Volume

30

Pages

1306 - 1313

Keywords

donation after brain death, donor management, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, organ preservation, transplant outcome, Adult, Brain Death, Cardiovascular Agents, Delayed Graft Function, Dopamine, Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation, Female, Humans, Kidney Transplantation, Liver Transplantation, Male, Middle Aged, Norepinephrine, Organ Preservation, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Retrospective Studies, Tissue and Organ Harvesting