Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Dr Gurdeep Mannu from the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford, has won the Office for National Statistics (ONS) Research Excellence Award for a study which highlighted early risk factors for breast cancer patients.

Dr Gurdeep Mannu © NDS

The study, which looked at more than 25 years of data on women receiving different breast cancer treatments, has been recognised by the ONS in its Research Excellence Awards for its insight and its important implications for management of patients with this kind of early-stage breast cancer in the future. 

Dr Gurdeep Mannu’s research showed that women who are diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (an early-stage breast cancer) during breast screening go on to experience higher risks of developing invasive breast cancer and of death from breast cancer, compared with the general population.

The research looked at data on 35,000 women in England diagnosed as having ductal carcinoma in situ by the NHS Breast Screening Programme from 1988 to 2014. It combined ONS mortality data with Hospital Episode Statistics from NHS Digital to show that the rate of women later developing invasive breast cancer was more than double what was expected, while mortality rates were 70% higher than expected.

These findings will have important implications for management of patients with this kind of early-stage breast cancer in the future. 

Dr Mannu’s project was chosen from a list of 20 applications, including research that was instrumental in shaping government COVID-19 decision-making and analysis.

The National Statistician Sir Ian Diamond said: “These awards recognise and celebrate outstanding, innovative research carried out using ONS secure data or data managed by ONS on behalf of others. Dr Mannu’s research was selected as the worthy winner in a year that has seen an exceptional standard of entries. 

“The potential impact of this work highlights the vital importance of sharing and linking data and it is fitting that he receives this award as we are marking Breast Cancer Awareness Month in the UK.”

Receiving this award has reinforced my enthusiasm for using the population-based data that Public Health England are able to collate in order to help those diagnosed with cancer
- Dr Gurdeep Mannu

Upon receiving the ONS Research Excellence Award Dr Mannu said: “I am absolutely delighted that our work has received this award. The Non-Invasive Breast Cancer in England study has been a highly collaborative project from its outset, bringing together data from the National Breast Screening Service, the National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service and the Office for National Statistics.

“This paper is the first to arise out of the project and we are currently working on several other aspects of the disease. Receiving this award has reinforced my enthusiasm for using the population-based data that Public Health England are able to collate in order to help those diagnosed with cancer.”

Funding for the study was provided by Cancer Research UK, the National Institute for Health Research Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, and the UK Medical Research Council. For information on other award winners and those who were commended for their work, please visit the ONS website. 

 

Meet the Award Winner

Similar stories

New Cochrane evidence highlights uncertainty about the interventions used to prevent and treat loss of smell after COVID-19 infection

Cochrane ENT at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences has published two systematic reviews investigating the effectiveness and safety of interventions to prevent and treat loss of smell following COVID-19 infection.

Using artificial intelligence (AI) for safer CT imaging of blood vessels

Congratulations to Dr Regent Lee at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) who has been awarded a grant of £246,226 from Heart Research UK for his research project ‘Using artificial intelligence (AI) for safer CT imaging of blood vessels’.

Developing new ways to assess kidneys so transplants last for longer

With funding from Kidney Research UK, a team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Nottingham and University College London will develop ways to assess donor kidneys and predict how well they will work after transplant.

Potential for radiotherapy and VTP multimodality therapy for prostate cancer

A recent collaborative study from the University of Oxford has investigated the potential benefit of a combined therapy approach to prostate cancer treatment, using radiotherapy and vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP), which could lead to first-in-man early phase clinical trials.

Oxford University and partners win government funding to evaluate Paige Prostate Cancer Detection System

A prostate cancer detection software system to help pathologists quickly identify suspicious areas of tissue, developed by Paige, will be investigated in a multicentre clinical study led by Oxford University as part of a successful NHSx Artificial Intelligence Health and Care Award application.

Omair Shariq wins Best Clinical Paper at the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons 2021 Annual Meeting

Dr Omair Shariq, a DPhil student and clinical research fellow in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) and Oxford Centre for Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism (OCDEM), has received the 2021 Best Presentation for Clinical Research award during the 41st Annual Meeting of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES), which was held virtually on 25-27 April 2021.

Blog posts

My virtual work experience with NDS and NDORMS

Louise Tan, a Year 12 student from Ballyclare in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, recently attended the joint NDS and NDORMS Virtual Work Experience. In this guest blog, Louise reflects on her experience.

Celebrating women of NDS

To celebrate 100 years since women were admitted as full members of the University and on the occasion of International Women's Day, a group of inspirational women in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) reflect on their journeys, their place in Medical Sciences and their vision for the next 100 years.

The life of a research nurse: supporting the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial

Research nurses in the NHS are playing a crucial role in helping to trial new coronavirus treatments and vaccines. Three NDS research nurses stepped up to help with the fight against this new disease. Here Bhumika Patel shares her experience of working on the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial.

Why I became a Peer Supporter

The Peer Support Programme was developed in recognition of the essential role students play in supporting and encouraging one another on a day-to-day basis throughout their time at university. NDS’ own Helen Stark discusses her experience of becoming a Peer Supporter.

Racism under the microscope

As Black History Month gets underway in the UK, NDS Athena SWAN Coordinator Emily Hotine puts racism under the microscope.