Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

On Friday 29 September, NDS took part in a festival of curiosity exploring the world of research across the University of Oxford's museums, libraries and gardens.

On Friday 29 September, NDS took part in a festival of curiosity exploring the world of research across the University of Oxford's museums, libraries and gardens.

Curiosity Carnival – Oxford’s European Researchers’ Night – was the largest public engagement event the University has ever staged. 9,400 people attended the event on the night and engaged with 493 researchers, DPhil students and academics from over 60 different departments and faculties across the University.

Situated in the Museum of Natural History, researchers from NDS shared with the public some of the exciting technology that we use within the department.

Dr Sarah Cross and Ms Rebecca Spiers chatted with many visitors of all ages about pancreatic islet isolation and transplantation, focussing on the innovations in beta-cell replacement therapy that over the last 50 years have enabled islet transplantation to become an effective, minimally invasive treatment option for people with type 1 diabetes.

Meanwhile, Consultant Neurosurgeon Mr James FitzGerald showed the technology used in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Visitors discovered how dorsal root ganglion stimulation works directly in the area where the pain signals are coming from and can be used to help reduce the effects of problems such as post-amputation pain and pain disorders, including complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome. 

Curiosity Carnival© NDSNDS was delighted to be joined by McLaren Applied Technologies. They have designed a system called WASP that utilises sensors, which are strapped to the arms of surgeons, to measure movement and thereby indicate to the surgeons how well they have performed a particular procedure, using metrics such as the number of hand movements and the smoothness of their movement. There was much interest in the system as many tried their hand at being a surgeon.

A gallery of photos from the event can be found here.

Similar stories

Guiding the next generation: virtual work experience is a hit

After the success of last year's virtual work experience, the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) again hosted an online work experience week for students interested in pursuing a career in science and medicine.

Using artificial intelligence (AI) for safer CT imaging of blood vessels

Congratulations to Dr Regent Lee at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) who has been awarded a grant of £246,226 from Heart Research UK for his research project ‘Using artificial intelligence (AI) for safer CT imaging of blood vessels’.

Developing new ways to assess kidneys so transplants last for longer

With funding from Kidney Research UK, a team of researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Nottingham and University College London will develop ways to assess donor kidneys and predict how well they will work after transplant.

Potential for radiotherapy and VTP multimodality therapy for prostate cancer

A recent collaborative study from the University of Oxford has investigated the potential benefit of a combined therapy approach to prostate cancer treatment, using radiotherapy and vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP), which could lead to first-in-man early phase clinical trials.

Oxford University and partners win government funding to evaluate Paige Prostate Cancer Detection System

A prostate cancer detection software system to help pathologists quickly identify suspicious areas of tissue, developed by Paige, will be investigated in a multicentre clinical study led by Oxford University as part of a successful NHSx Artificial Intelligence Health and Care Award application.

Omair Shariq wins Best Clinical Paper at the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons 2021 Annual Meeting

Dr Omair Shariq, a DPhil student and clinical research fellow in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) and Oxford Centre for Diabetes Endocrinology and Metabolism (OCDEM), has received the 2021 Best Presentation for Clinical Research award during the 41st Annual Meeting of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES), which was held virtually on 25-27 April 2021.

Blog posts

My virtual work experience with NDS and NDORMS

Louise Tan, a Year 12 student from Ballyclare in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, recently attended the joint NDS and NDORMS Virtual Work Experience. In this guest blog, Louise reflects on her experience.

Celebrating women of NDS

To celebrate 100 years since women were admitted as full members of the University and on the occasion of International Women's Day, a group of inspirational women in the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (NDS) reflect on their journeys, their place in Medical Sciences and their vision for the next 100 years.

The life of a research nurse: supporting the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial

Research nurses in the NHS are playing a crucial role in helping to trial new coronavirus treatments and vaccines. Three NDS research nurses stepped up to help with the fight against this new disease. Here Bhumika Patel shares her experience of working on the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Trial.

Why I became a Peer Supporter

The Peer Support Programme was developed in recognition of the essential role students play in supporting and encouraging one another on a day-to-day basis throughout their time at university. NDS’ own Helen Stark discusses her experience of becoming a Peer Supporter.

Racism under the microscope

As Black History Month gets underway in the UK, NDS Athena SWAN Coordinator Emily Hotine puts racism under the microscope.