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On Friday 29 September, NDS took part in a festival of curiosity exploring the world of research across the University of Oxford's museums, libraries and gardens.

Curiosity carnival

Curiosity Carnival – Oxford’s European Researchers’ Night – was the largest public engagement event the University has ever staged. 9,400 people attended the event on the night and engaged with 493 researchers, DPhil students and academics from over 60 different departments and faculties across the University.

Situated in the Museum of Natural History, researchers from NDS shared with the public some of the exciting technology that we use within the department.

Dr Sarah Cross and Ms Rebecca Spiers chatted with many visitors of all ages about pancreatic islet isolation and transplantation, focussing on the innovations in beta-cell replacement therapy that over the last 50 years have enabled islet transplantation to become an effective, minimally invasive treatment option for people with type 1 diabetes.

Meanwhile, Consultant Neurosurgeon Mr James FitzGerald showed the technology used in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Visitors discovered how dorsal root ganglion stimulation works directly in the area where the pain signals are coming from and can be used to help reduce the effects of problems such as post-amputation pain and pain disorders, including complex regional pain syndrome and failed back surgery syndrome. 

Curiosity CarnivalNDS was delighted to be joined by McLaren Applied Technologies. They have designed a system called WASP that utilises sensors, which are strapped to the arms of surgeons, to measure movement and thereby indicate to the surgeons how well they have performed a particular procedure, using metrics such as the number of hand movements and the smoothness of their movement. There was much interest in the system as many tried their hand at being a surgeon.

A gallery of photos from the event can be found here.