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The Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences’ Research Away Day was held on Thursday 1 October in St Catherine’s College in Oxford. The event aimed to showcase the current research activities in the department.

Current PGR students, ACFs, ACLs and other researchers within the department were invited to present their research through talks and posters to an audience composed of NDS staff and students. Those judged to have given the best talks and presented the best poster were presented with a certificate by the Head of Department, Professor Freddie Hamdy.

Congratulations to the prize winners:

NDS Research Away DaySiobhan Webb - Best Oral Presentation for ‘The Anti-Diabetic Drug Metformin Reduces Tumour Burden and Osteolytic Bone Disease in Multiple Myeloma in vivo’

Letizia Lo Faro - Runner up in the Oral Presentation for ‘Targeting Metabolic Pathways in Brain Dead Donors to Improve Outcomes of Kidney Transplantation’

Kate Milward - Best Poster Presentation for ‘Genetic Engineering of Human Regulatory T Cells’

Clinical Lecturer Regent Lee, who hosted the day's event along with Director of Surgical Education Professor Ashok Handa, said: 'The second annual NDS Research Away Day concluded with great success. This year we had the honour to celebrate Professor Neil Mortensen's achievements during his plenary speech, as the event also served as a prelude to his Festschrift. Our colorectal colleagues also shared their research during the highlight session. We had great attendance from NDS staff, and an impressive range of research was presented during the day.'

There were also two parallel sessions - Time Management and Assertiveness - for non-research members of the department and during the evening a dinner was held in the dining hall, providing an opportunity for members of the department to socialise and mingle.

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