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Today University of Oxford and AstraZeneca researchers present a pooled analysis of Phase 3 trials of a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 across two different dose regimens, resulting in an average efficacy of 70.4%.

Phase 3 human trials of Oxford coronavirus vaccine © John Cairns
  • Researchers show overall vaccine efficacy of 70.4% from a pooled analysis of two-dose regimen
  • No hospitalisations or severe disease observed in the vaccinated groups from three weeks after first dose
  • Efficacy results are based on data taken from 11,636 volunteers across the United Kingdom and Brazil
  • Data are first Phase 3 trial results of a coronavirus vaccine to be published in peer-review literature

The new study published in the Lancet is the first peer-reviewed publication of phase 3 data from studies of a vaccine against the coronavirus. 

The efficacy data are based on 11,636 volunteers across the United Kingdom and Brazil, and combined across three groups of people vaccinated – two groups who received a standard dose prime vaccination followed by a standard dose booster vaccination and one group (in the UK only) who received a low dose prime vaccination followed by a standard dose vaccination.

The full story is available on the University of Oxford website

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