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Journal of the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences (JNDS) has published its next issue, featuring top case reports written by University of Oxford medical students during their clinical studies.

Simultaneous pancreas kidney transplant.  Features contralateral placement of grafted organs, intestinal exocrine drainage (via the duodenal-jejunal anastomosis) and endocrine drainage into the systemic circulation (via the donor hepatic portal vein). Vascular supply of the pancreatic graft is via a Y-graft connecting the donor superior mesenteric artery and splenic artery to the recipient right common iliac artery. R: recipient; D: donor. (See Case Study by Nixon et al.)
Cover image - Vol. 2 No. 1 (2020): Michaelmas Term 2020

In this latest issue, there are six case studies from Oxford medical students and two surgeon profiles to celebrate diversity.

Conor Hennessy, Elisha Ngetich and Devon Brameier write about Hamilton Naki who became an essential part of the research group responsible for the first heart transplant. Whilst Jamie McVeigh spotlights Peter Kalu, Consultant Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. 

Ismail Cassimjee also provides 'A commentary on Hamilton Naki: From Gardening to Greatness', Emily Hotine discusses racism in medicine and Joel Ward explains JNDS's indexing journey. 

Read this issue of JNDS

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