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BACKGROUND: Few data are available on the long-term outcome of endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm as compared with open repair. METHODS: From 1999 through 2004 at 37 hospitals in the United Kingdom, we randomly assigned 1252 patients with large abdominal aortic aneurysms (> or = 5.5 cm in diameter) to undergo either endovascular or open repair; 626 patients were assigned to each group. Patients were followed for rates of death, graft-related complications, reinterventions, and resource use until the end of 2009. Logistic regression and Cox regression were used to compare outcomes in the two groups. RESULTS: The 30-day operative mortality was 1.8% in the endovascular-repair group and 4.3% in the open-repair group (adjusted odds ratio for endovascular repair as compared with open repair, 0.39; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18 to 0.87; P=0.02). The endovascular-repair group had an early benefit with respect to aneurysm-related mortality, but the benefit was lost by the end of the study, at least partially because of fatal endograft ruptures (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.57 to 1.49; P=0.73). By the end of follow-up, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the rate of death from any cause (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.23; P=0.72). The rates of graft-related complications and reinterventions were higher with endovascular repair, and new complications occurred up to 8 years after randomization, contributing to higher overall costs. CONCLUSIONS: In this large, randomized trial, endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm was associated with a significantly lower operative mortality than open surgical repair. However, no differences were seen in total mortality or aneurysm-related mortality in the long term. Endovascular repair was associated with increased rates of graft-related complications and reinterventions and was more costly. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN55703451.)

Original publication

DOI

10.1056/NEJMoa0909305

Type

Journal article

Journal

N Engl J Med

Publication Date

20/05/2010

Volume

362

Pages

1863 - 1871

Keywords

Aged, Angioplasty, Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal, Blood Vessel Prosthesis, Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Hospital Mortality, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Logistic Models, Male, Proportional Hazards Models, Reoperation, Vascular Surgical Procedures