Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The one-year taught course begins in October and is divided into three terms. The first two terms are taught terms, while the third term is spent on a research project which leads to a dissertation. This project will take place within a University of Oxford laboratory.

THE FIRST TERM

In Michaelmas Term (Term One) students study the fundamental science of immunology. These include immunogenetics, molecular, cellular and in vivo (whole animal, including human) immunology. These areas are integrated with relevant areas of related sciences e.g. genetics, molecular and cellular biology, biochemistry, pharmacology, anatomy and physiology.

THE SECOND TERM

In Hilary Term (Term Two) students study clinical and applied aspects of immunology. These include infection and immunity, immunodeficiencies, autoimmunity and hypersensitivity, cancer and immunomodulation including drugs, transplantation and vaccinology. These areas are integrated with relevant areas of clinical sciences e.g. virology, bacteriology, mycology and parasitology, organ-based pathologies (e.g. examples from neurology, rheumatology, and gastroenterology), and clinical oncology.

THE THIRD TERM

In Trinity Term (Term Three) students undertake an original, supervised research project to gain an understanding of research techniques in immunology or a related area. This is achieved by means of a fourteen week supervised project, plus two week write up time, in an University of Oxford laboratory. The research supervisor provides regular supervision and guidance during the course of the research project.

ASSESSMENT

The degree examination currently comprises five formally assessed components. 

Term 1Essay (up to 4000 words)20%Week 8
Computer-based examination on fundamental aspects of immunology10%Week 10
Term 2Clinical case commentaries (two of up to 3,000 words each)20%Week 8
Computer-based examination on applied aspects of immunology10%Week 10
Term 3Dissertation on a research project (up to 10,000 words)40%Late July

Candidates are also examined by viva voce at the end of each term.

Formative assessments, including poster and oral presentations, are also in place throughout the year and while these do not contribute to final grades, feedback is given.

PRIZES

Each year the Board of Examiners award a 'Best Dissertation' prize to a member of the class.