Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement was developed to improve the reporting quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Our primary aim was to assess to what extent reports of RCTs in solid organ transplantation adhere to the 2010 CONSORT statement. Secondly, we investigated the relationship between CONSORT adherence, methodological quality and some other factors. We included 290 RCTs that were published between 2007 and 2009. We examined to what extent trial reports complied with 30 items of the CONSORT statement. Methodological quality was evaluated using the Jadad scale plus allocation concealment and whether data analysis was by randomized group (intention to treat). On average, trial reports addressed 47% of the CONSORT items. Forty-three per cent of RCTs was considered to be of good quality according to Jadad scale, and the items allocation concealment and data analysis were satisfied in approximately one-third of trials. Good quality RCTs reported on more CONSORT items than poor quality trials. The methodological quality and adherence to the CONSORT statement of RCTs published in journals that endorse the CONSORT statement was superior to those in journals without CONSORT endorsement. Overall compliance with the CONSORT statement and the methodological quality of RCTs in organ transplantation remains unsatisfactory.

Original publication

DOI

10.1111/tri.12034

Type

Journal article

Journal

Transpl Int

Publication Date

03/2013

Volume

26

Pages

300 - 306

Keywords

Female, Graft Rejection, Graft Survival, Guideline Adherence, Humans, Incidence, Male, Needs Assessment, Organ Transplantation, Practice Guidelines as Topic, Quality Control, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Retrospective Studies, United Kingdom